In the Old Testament, God called His people to action with the blast of the shofar, a ram’s horn. He still calls His people today.

In this relevant and timely novel, dynamic young preacher Paul Hudson is committed to building his church—but at what cost? When Paul accepted the call to pastor the struggling church, he had no idea what to expect. But it didn’t take long for Paul to turn Centerville Christian Church around. Attendance is up, way up, and everything is going so well. If only his wife, Eunice, could see it that way. Still, he tries not to let her quiet presence distract him. But Eunice knows that something isn’t right . . . and it hasn’t been for a long time.

The more Paul’s zeal and ambition builds, the more he loses sight of the One who called him. As Paul and those around him struggle to discern what it truly means to live out their faith, they must ultimately choose between their own will and God’s plan.

My Rating: *****

My Review:

I don’t read christian fiction except for Francine Rivers. She began as a romance writer and then began writing christian fiction which definitely was a bonus for the genre. She captures being a christian truthfully with all the joys, struggles and heartache of everyday life.Shofar is about what a church really means. It isn’t about the building and numbers/goals or is it people who are trying to follow Christ. I loved getting to witness the different characters’ relationships with God and how they developed over time. Paul is a young, enthusiastic pastor who is given too much power and has too little accountability in a growing church. He believes this on the basis that if it is growing it must be a sign of God’s blessing. He continues to move forward gradually using more and more of his own strength and less and less of God’s. A young, enthusiastic and dynamic pastor is given too much power and has too little accountability in a growing church. He justifies this on the basis that if it is growing it must be a sign of God’s blessing and so he continues to move forward gradually using more and more of his own strength and less and less of God’s. A young, enthusiastic and dynamic pastor is given too much power and has too little accountability in a growing church. He justifies this on the basis that if it is growing it must be a sign of God’s blessing and so he continues to move forward gradually using more and more of his own strength and less and less of God’s.

Wounding both new and old members of his congregation, ignoring his son Paul’s needs and

the ignoring the breakdown of his marriage are only a few of the many mistakes Paul makes.

I especially enjoyed the honest way she portrayed the anguish and faith of the pastor’s wife.

If you have ever wondered about your own walk with Christ this author will blow you away with the raw honesty she relaysin her stories.

https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/95619.And_The_Shofar_Blew

https://www.amazon.com/Shofar-Blew-Francine-Rivers-ebook/dp/B000FCKCHY/ref=tmm_kin_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=1598470835&sr=8-1

https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/6492.Francine_Rivers

https://www.amazon.com/Francine-Rivers/e/B000AQ2VFQ?ref_=dbs_p_ebk_r00_abau_000000